Dumpster

36 thoughts on “Dumpster

      • Hello,

        Thank you for your interest in Gregory’s work. If you would like to get in touch with him you can reach him at his direct email greg.kloehn@gmail.com. Currently he is working on a project in Red Hook Brooklyn at Pioneer Works http://pioneerworks.org/ he is there everyday in August. You are welcome to come see the dumpster and the new sculpture he is working on. He would interested in meeting and speaking with you.

        Thank You,

        -Erica Blue

  1. Pingback: Video Interlude: This Man Actually Lives In A Dumpster He Tricked Out Himself – insiderater.com

  2. Pingback: This Tiny NYC Abode is Literally a Dumpster With a Stove | therealestateconsultantsupland

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

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  4. Congrats Brother we need people like you in this society to solve problems with distintion and intellicence. I want to meet you one day to discuss the green thinking. I love this topic.

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

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  6. Pingback: Brooklyn Man Pimps Out a Dumpster, Beats the System | Diet Fitness and Health

  7. Pingback: Inside a Dumpster House in Red Hook, Brooklyn with Artist Greg Kloehn | Untapped Cities

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    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  9. That is awesome!! May the Lord always provide the means to do what you do to bless those that aren’t able to repay. May God give you the strength and the deires of your heart.

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  10. My wealthy mother lives in a 4,000 sq ft house all by herself. She has got hers and doesn’t give a rat’s ass about the homeless, poor and needy children who live in other, less-desirable areas (apartments) as far away from her as possible. Is this the way that these huge, well-funded churches feel? Go to church on Sunday, throw a twenty in each of the baskets that are passed and you’ll feel like my mom does – like she’s a true humanitarian who has one her part to save the world: Just as long as they don’t follow her home – to her mega-home with all of its comforts and amenities. If there is a god, I hope she’s ready to explain herself upon her demise because I still see suffering that she is content to look the other way from.

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  11. Hey, if you’re ever in southern PA, let me know. I’d love to see how you do these (I’m a carpenter/home improvement guy, thats what I do for a living)

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  12. I’m curious to know if you would like some form of contribution to your project.

    What you are doing is really very special.

    I live in Murphys, Ca and I would be able to come up to Oakland to meet you and see what could be set up – donation-wise.

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  13. Pingback: Umělec vyrábí z odpadků malé domovy pro bezdomovce | Creativelife.cz – Blog o kreativním životě | ART, FOTO, DESIGN, DIY, BYDLENÍ, ARCHITEKTURA

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  14. Hi Gregory,
    You are an absolute living legend. Do you have much interaction with the people who live in your little homes? Do you manage to get to know these people and the reasons for their living on the streets? I live in Melbourne, Australia, and have wanted to build a settlement for street people for some time now. My wife and I have taken people in but it can get difficult, to say the least. However, we have also had some great laughs. We now want to go the next step if that is at all possible.
    May God bless the incredible work that you do and may He watch over and guide you.

    Leonard Carroll

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  15. Me emociona su accion. Si alguna vez está por Argentina desearía llevarlo a conocer algunas intervenciones que hacemos por aqui en los barrios carenciados. Quisiera preguntarle si ha podido integrar en la construccion a los mismos destinatarios?
    Lo felicito!
    Diana

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

  16. Pingback: These 31 Converted Homes Are Made From The Most Unlikely Spaces - Eye Opening Info | Eye Opening Info

    • Hello,

      Thank you all for your interest in the Homeless Homes Project (HHP). We have had such an out pouring of positive feedback, great ideas and lots of encouragement. Thank you all for donating money, time and ideas to this project and expressing you concern for the homeless. We wanted to give everyone an update about the project and answer some of the questions that are coming at us. This email includes information about….

      Searching for a New Space
      Workshops
      DIY Folks
      Photos
      Interning and Volunteering
      The City
      The Books
      Talks and Lecture
      Homeless Homes
      Material Donations
      Funding, Donations
      FAQ’s

      Searching for a New Space
      At the moment the HHP is looking for a new space. We are ourselves are homeless… The warehouse that we were working in was a donated space. We stored all of our materials there that we found on the streets and those donated by many kind people. But that space had to close due to some fire and structural issues. We had to leave. Currently we are looking for another place to hold workshops and store all of our materials. If you know anyone that may have a space for us in Oakland please let us know.
      Even an outdoor lot will do!

      Workshops
      I have a passport and I am happy to go anywhere to teach people how to build. All I need is a ticket, a place to stay, some food, tools, people and somewhere to work. These homes are easy and fun to make, its not rocket science, anyone with a few skills can throw one together with the help of friends.
      Local workshops will resume when we find a new space. Keep your ears open….
      Your email address will be added to our mailing list and we will let you know when the next work day is.

      DIY Folks
      Many people have been interested in starting a Homeless Homes Project in their city or town. I would love it if other people would build these types of homes for their community! We can include photos of your work on our Homeless Homes Project Website. Check out the website to see some of the process photos and start it up! You don’t need anyone’s permission to help homeless people, grab some garbage and go for it. We will eventually make a “How to Video” but you can see a lot from the photos. You don’t have to be a trained engineer to make these. You just have to like to build.

      Photos
      If you are interested in getting high resolution photos or permission for the photos go to homelesshomesproject.org use any photos you see there and credit Brian Reynolds our photographer. Brian wants to make them available for everyone to have access to these images. There are also images available at gregorykloehn.com

      Interning and Volunteering
      We welcome help with this project. There are so many different jobs that could be done to help people. When I return in the Fall we will start up again (When we find our space…) In addition to building we would like to find an artist that can help us with silk screening images of the houses on to clothing found in the streets. Lot’s of things to do if you are interested.

      What does the city say?
      We are just putting these out there. We have yet to hear from the city.

      How can I get your books?
      The book Homeless Architecture is about the homeless and how they build out of found objects. I will be working on a book that shows people how to make these homes.
      They are not available yet… I am busy building more homes…If anyone wants to help me put together a “How to Book” I am open to working with an architect who has the ability to do technical drawings. But mind you no 2 places are alike.

      Talks and Lecture
      I also love to talk about the HHP and what I do, so please let me know of any speaking opportunities you may have available. I have a Power Point presentation, and a clean shirt, that shows the progression of this project.

      Material Donations
      Material donations will have to be put on hold until I can find a donate a space.

      Funding, Donations
      We welcome any kind of help to continue the project. We also welcome help to start a development committee who could research grants and help us apply for them.
      You can go to homelesshomesproject.org and click on the Donate button.

      Or send checks directly to:

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project
      2864 Helen St.
      Oakland, CA 94608

      Please contact me at:

      greg.kloehn@gmail.com

      Thank You Again,

      Gregory Kloehn and the Homeless Homes Project

      FAQ’s

      Your name, age, occupation, where you live?
      Gregory Lincoln Kloehn, 43, Artist, Oakland, California

      When did the idea of the project come to you?
      About 3 years ago.

      Where did the idea for the project come from?
      From the homeless themselves. I use the same materials they used to build with.

      Do you work solo? Or do others help?
      Mostly I work alone but many people have contacted me and want to help. Now I am trying to organize workshops and volunteers!

      Is each home given to one homeless person, or are they put in one place for anyone to use?
      I give them to the homeless that I know living right in my neighborhood. I make a home for each person or a couple. Some people live just down the block from me. They are my neighbors.

      How long it takes you to build one of this house ?
      Alone a week or so faster with help.

      You use salvaged materials found into trashes, but what materials more precisely?

      -Ply Wood
      - OSB Board
      -2x4s, 2x6s, 4x4s
      -Futon Frames
      -Bed frames
      -Solid doors
      - Any real wood of about any size
      - Glass Refrigerator shelves
      - Auto Glass
      - Hinges (any size)
      -Door locks (for doors and windows)
      -Screws (11/2″- 3″)
      - Nails (for nail gun & framing and roofing)
      -Glue (silicon, painters caulk)
      -Paint brushes & Rollers
      -Exterior paint (semi gloss preferred)
      -Sand paper
      -Saw blades/ disc grinder blades
      -Large Casters (200+ lb. load)

      I suppose that you have to buy some material as glue or paint, what is the cost for one house then ?
      Some of the above items I find others I have to buy. Some local business donate items.

      Your houses are really colorful, is there a meaning behind it ?
      That is the paint I found on the street. But I do like vibrant colors.

      It was important for you to do those mobiles ?
      Yes absolutely! Homeless people get moved by the city and need to relocate to a new area every few weeks.

      When you first put one house in the street, what was the reaction of the people ?
      People loved them!

      And the reaction of homeless people ?
      They are so happy! One cried and got on his knees to thank me. They think I should make them bigger and suggest improvements. They like to decorate them themselves.

      How many homeless people use your house ?
      Right now 25 or so. One couple had their home burned, another stolen and one even sold his. It is tough out there. So I keep making more.

      You mentioned on your website that if people want to help you, they are welcomed. So, how people already helped you ?
      Tons of people have come out to help. But we just lost our space to work and I need to fine a new building or lot to hold the work shops in I can’t fit that many people in my studio. Please spread the word that we are looking for a space.

      Have you planed to export your idea in other part of USA, or even in other parts of the world ?
      I hope people everywhere start building homes for the homeless. I am happy to go anywhere to show people how to or encourage them just to start on their own. Send me a ticket and I am there.

      Where did your interest in very tiny homes come from?
      I have been doing construction for many years and I have a art degree. I combined my love of building with art and the joy I get from helping others. My interest in very tiny homes comes from building a lot of different styles of homes/condos and realizing that the smaller I went the happier I was. There is a spontaneity and playfulness in making small homes that traditional houses do not offer. It reminds me of making forts as a kid, no city planners, no architects, no crews, no bank loans, just my ideas and my hands and the stuff I find in the streets.

      Why do you think they are appealing?
      Tiny houses are striking a number of cords in our society. They are not just homes but fast becoming a life style option. They are, usually, (but not always) cheaper then regular homes, giving more people the opportunity of ownership. By skipping the traditional 30 years mortgage, perhaps the tiny home movement could even reshape the way we think about work and what we want to accomplish with our lives.
      The tiny home movement is also embracing and mixing all forms of new and old technologies, making them hotbeds of ingenuity, creativity and environmentalism. Small spaces means that its easier to power an entire house with the sun or wind, and water can be collected, used, used again and reused with simple catch and filtration systems. Even black waste can be turned into methane and/or composite for food production. From the loner in a simple tipi, to the high tech self contained living pod, the tiny homes have something for everyone.
      Many of the tiny homes are on wheels or small enough to be moved with relative ease. I think this degree of mobility is one of the most revolutionary aspects of the tiny home movement; What if you bought or built the home you wanted, then rented the land. Your customized home could follow you wherever you needed to be. If you built a home that followed you throughout your life, I bet you would be a bit more thoughtful in your choices.

      WHAT ARE YOUR NEW HOMELESS SHELTER PROJECTS ALL ABOUT?

      Its just getting started, so I don’t know exactly how its going to unfold, but the Homeless Homes Project grew from the large outpouring of people wanting to contribute to the homes I’ve been building for the homeless. Following an article in the Oakland tribune, I was inundated with emails of people wanting to help and I thought that I should channel this good will. So the Homeless Homes Project was started to bring people together to make simple, mobil shelters out of garbage for those living on the streets. As of now, people come to my shop and help me on the homes I already have in progress. Soon we are moving to a larger space that can accommodate workshops and larger builds. It would be nice to take these worships on the road and build with people in different communities and environments.

      WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO BUILD THEM?

      I wish that I could say that I set out to house the homeless, but my motivation was not so lofty. At the time, I was working on a book about Homeless Architecture and following the various structures that are created by people living on the streets. I quickly became enamored by their resourcefulness to take objects found on the street and create homes and a livelihood from them. I was inspired to take these same materials back to my shop and put them together in a more permanent fashion. After about a week of collecting and building, I had a 21st century hunter/gather home, built from the discarded fruits of the urban jungle.
      This sat at my studio for a number of months, just collecting dust. One rainy night, Charlene, a homeless woman I’ve known for some 10 years, asked if I had a tarp for her. I told her I didn’t have one
      and I went back inside. As I walked past the home, it hit me,I should give her this. I ran back out and told her to come back tomorrow and I would have a home for her. She and her husband Oscar came back the next day, I handed them a set of keys and a bottle of champagne and watched them push it down the street. It felt so good that I started making another one that same day.

      DO THEY HAVE NAMES?

      I usually do come up with names for them while i’m working on them. R2D2, The Settler, Romanian Farm House, Uni-bomber Shack, the Tank and The Chuck Wagon are all some names I’ve given to them. With no two alike, its easy for them to take on a unique identity.

      EVERYONE KNOWS YOU FROM THE DUMPSTER HOME, WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THAT EXPERIENCE FOR THIS NEW PROJECT?

      The Dumpster Home taught me many lessons. Most importantly for this, or any project, it reminded me to stick to my original vision. Regardless of what others say, or what you may even say to yourself about an idea, if you think it has merit and you want to do it, you should just do it. Don’t let petty details derail your desires, you can deal with those later, what’s important is the essence of your ideas. I’ve made my share of mistakes and a lot of dumb stuff to go with it, but if you feel the persistent need to do something, it is better to do it then not.
      So, for the Homeless Homes Project, I want to run with this free form building technique that I’m having such a great time with and make a bunch of prototype structures and give them away. I want to challenge myself as to what I can make a home out of, and in the process be able to make a difference in someones life.

      WHAT ARE THE SHELTERS BUILT OUT OF? HOW WILL THEY BE UTILIZED?

      The Homeless Homes are primarily built out of illegally dumped garbage and industrial waste. In the mornings, I get a coffee and drive around to the dumping hot spots in Oakland and see what I can find. I look for pallets, bed frames, futon frames, doors, plywood, OSB board, paint, packing crates, car consoles, auto glass, refrigerator shelves…etc. I basically look for anything made out of real wood, any tempered glass and sturdy frames for the walls. The only items I must buy are nails, screws, glue, paint brushes and saw blades. Everything else comes from the street or the dumpster.
      When the home is completed, I push it out to the street, take some photos of it, then give it away. From that point on, I have no more say in it. The homes take on a life of there own. One was stolen, one was sold, one was firebombed, one is in a neighbors back yard with dogs living in it, the rest are still on the streets with people living in them.

      WHAT IS NEXT?

      With an endless supply of garbage and a large number of homeless, I know that I can keep busy for a while with the Homeless Homes. I’ve got a few new designs that I want to make with pallets and garbage. I would love to make a functioning city from garbage, or at least some businesses. I must also finish up a project in New York using four shipping containers. Bikes, carts and dumpsters are objects that I think about a lot. The most important place for me to be next, is in my shop. That is where my ideas become reality.

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